WHO Director-General’s opening remarks on 23 October 2020

WHO Director-General’s opening remarks at the media briefing on COVID-19;
23 October 2020

https://www.who.int/director-general/speeches/detail/who-director-general-s-opening-remarks-at-the-media-briefing-on-covid-19—23-october-2020

  • We are at a critical juncture in this pandemic, particularly in the northern hemisphere.
    The next few months are going to be very tough and some countries are on a dangerous track. We urge leaders to take immediate action, to prevent further unnecessary deaths,
    essential health services from collapsing and schools shutting again.  
  • Oxygen is one of the most essential medicines for saving patients with COVID-19, and many other conditions. WHO is committed to working in solidarity with all governments, partners and the private sector to scale up sustainable oxygen supply.
  • Tomorrow marks World Polio Day week, and partners around the world – led in particular by Rotary International – are organising events and raising awareness about the need to eradicate polio.  
  • Smallpox eradication is a remarkable achievement, not least because it was completed at the heart of the Cold War. Health did then and should now always come above politics and it is with sadness that this week we lost one of the great titans of smallpox eradication with the passing of Dr Mike Lane. We will continue to honour his legacy. 
  • WHO is proud to announce the second Health for All Film Festival, to cultivate visual storytelling about public health.

****

Good morning, good afternoon and good evening.

We are at a critical juncture in this pandemic, particularly in the northern hemisphere.

The next few months are going to be very tough and some countries are on a dangerous track.

Too many countries are seeing an exponential increase in cases and that is now leading to hospitals and ICU running close or above capacity and we’re still only in October.

We urge leaders to take immediate action, to prevent further unnecessary deaths, essential health services from collapsing and schools shutting again.

As I said it in February and I’m repeating it today: This is not a drill!

We’re calling on governments to carry out 5 key actions today.

First, assess the current outbreak situation in your country based on the latest data you have to hand. Conduct honest analysis and consider the good, the bad and the ugly.

I have a specific message for those countries that have successfully brought COVID-19 transmission under control: Now is the time to double down to keep transmission at a low level, be vigilant, be ready to identify and cases and clusters and take quick action.

Do not allow the virus to take hold again.

Second, for those countries where cases, hospitalizations and ICU rates are rising, make the necessary adjustments and course correct as quickly as possible.

Making changes when needed shows leadership and strength.

Third, it’s important to be clear and honest with the public about the status of the pandemic in your country and what is needed from every citizen to get through this pandemic together.

Fourth, put systems in place to make it easier for citizens to comply with the measures that are advised.

This means, if people are told to isolate or quarantine, or businesses have to close temporarily, governments need to do everything they can to assist individuals, families and businesses.

Fifth, the next few months for many people will be difficult.

There are incredible stories of hope and resilience of people and businesses responding creatively to the outbreak and we need to share these widely.

Governments need to carry out the basic steps of speaking to people who are infected with the virus and their contacts and giving them specific instructions on what to do next.

If governments are able to hone their contact tracing systems and focus on isolating all cases and quarantining contacts, then mandatory stay at home orders for everyone can be avoided.

  • We’ve seen many times from around the world that it’s never too late for leaders to act and turn the outbreak around.

===
Key to a united front against the virus is sharing resources equitably.                                      

Oxygen is one of the most essential medicines for saving patients with COVID-19, and many other conditions.

Many countries simply do not have enough oxygen available to assist sick patients as they struggle to breathe.

I’m going to talk to you about what WHO and partners are doing to fill the global oxygen gap.

Estimates suggest that some of the poorest countries may have just 5 to 20 percent of the oxygen that they need for patient care.

Through the pandemic, the demand for oxygen has grown exponentially.

Back in June, when there were approximately 140 thousand new COVID-19 cases a day, the global need for oxygen was estimated to be approximately 88 thousand large cylinders each day across the world.

As daily cases rise around the world to over 400 thousand, the need for oxygen has gone up to 1.2 million cylinders each day, just in low- and middle-income alone, which is 13 times higher.

Early in the pandemic, WHO’s approach was to scale up oxygen in the most vulnerable countries by procuring and distributing oxygen concentrators.

This led to over 30 thousand concentrators, 40 thousand pulse oximeters and patient monitors to reach 121 countries, including 37 that are classified as fragile.

This includes installing pressure swing adsorption plants – or PSAs – that would be able to cover the supply needed for a large hospital and district health facilities in the area.

Somalia, Chad and South Sudan had to rely exclusively on oxygen cylinders from private vendors that are often traveling long distances and come with a high price-tag.

WHO is working with the ministries of health in these three countries to design oxygen plants fit for their local needs, which will result in sustainable and self sufficient oxygen supply.

WHO is committed to working in solidarity with all governments, partners and the private sector to scale up sustainable oxygen supply.

The oxygen project, reflects WHO’s commitment to end-to-end solutions and innovation to do what we do better, cheaper and reach more people.

For example, we’re working with partners to harness solar power to run oxygen concentrators in remote places where electricity supply is unreliable, and to reduce costs.

One of the main barriers to medical oxygen is the high transport costs of the cylinders to the health facilities.

In Kenya, a private sector company has positioned oxygen plants near clusters of health facilities and uses a milk delivery system to deliver oxygen to more than 140 clinics.

Incentivizing the business sector to change its approach and model is key to ensuring sustainable oxygen in low- and middle-income countries.

And to be successful the health work force needs to be ready.

Not only doctors and nurses with experience in caring for severely ill patients; but also biomedical engineers, respiratory therapists, and maintenance staff.

Oxygen saves lives of patients with COVID-19 but it will also save some of the 800 thousand children under-five that die every year of pneumonia and improve the overall safety of surgery.

A better world means ensuring oxygen is available for all.  Where they need it, and when they need it.

===

Tomorrow marks World Polio Day week, and partners around the world – led in particular by Rotary International – are organising events and raising awareness about the need to eradicate polio.

Over the summer the world collectively welcomed Africa’s historic success of ridding the continent of wild poliovirus.

Thanks to hundreds of thousands of health workers reaching millions of children with safe and effective vaccines across the continent, the world celebrated one of the greatest public health achievements of all time.

However, while there is polio anywhere, the world remains at risk of resurgence.

Following suspension of polio and routine immunisation due to the pandemic, vaccination drives have now been restarted.

We applaud and encourage governments for doing catch-up campaigns so that no child is left behind and we can soon consign polio to the history books, alongside smallpox.

===

Smallpox eradication is a remarkable achievement, not least because it was completed at the heart of the Cold War.

Health did then and should now always come above politics and it is with sadness that this week we lost one of the great titans of smallpox eradication with the passing of Dr Mike Lane.

Dr Mike Lane spent 13 years chasing down the last remnants of smallpox, finding cases and vaccinating communities in some of the remotest corners of the Earth, where smallpox was still endemic.

At CDC, Dr Lane was the last programme director of the Smallpox Eradication Program and received many awards, including the US Public Health Service’s Commendation Medal.

For many years, Dr Lane was an advisor to WHO on smallpox.

I wish to express my deepest sympathy to Dr Lane’s friends and family. We will continue to honour his legacy.

===

Finally, telling stories is as old as human civilization.

It helps us understand our problems and can inspire action that changes lives.

WHO is proud to announce the second Health for All Film Festival, to cultivate visual storytelling about public health.

Submissions are open from tomorrow to 30 January 2021.

We look forward to receiving original short films from across the world.

More details are available on our website.

I thank you.

 

Sağlık Bakanı ve Türk usulü filyasyon

Sağlık Bakanı ve Türk usulü filyasyon

Nuriye Ortaylı


Doktor, Halk Sağlığı Uzman
21 Eylül 2020,
https://yetkinreport.com/2020/09/21/saglik-bakani-ve-turk-usulu-filyasyon/?fbclid=IwAR048f3tiotzRdALrRl9DafpnjHhQtuKO7hvyRfwOtLzQDrvdaF3C3tM4ws

Sağlık Bakanı Koca’nın filyasyonla ilgili son açıklamaları gerçeklerle tam örtüşmüyor. (Foto: Twitter/CNNTürk)

Sağlık Bakanı Fahrettin Koca Hürriyet’ten Ahmet Hakan’la görüşmesinde Türkiye’deki filyasyonun dünyada eşi benzeri olmadığını söylemiş. Salgının başından beri hemen her alanda tekrar tekrar duyduğumuz bir nokta bu. Yalnızca Türkiye’de uygulanan ilaç tedavileri, yalnızca Türkiye’nin ulaştığı tedavi başarı oranları, yalnızca Türkiye’de uygulanan haftasonu sokağa çıkma yasakları. Sağlık Bakanlığı salgın yönetiminde orijinalliği önemsiyor.
Her ne kadar yeni Koronavirüs, adı üstünde yeni bir etken olsa da salgınlar yeni değil. Yazılı tarihte, hatta daha öncesinde (Firavun, Musa’yı dinlemediği için Mısır’a bir salgın hastalık musallat olur) salgınlar vardı. İnsanlık, Covid’i tedavi etmeyi yeni yeni, deneye yanıla öğreniyor. Henüz aşı ya da önleyici bir tedavi geliştirilemedi, ama salgınları, Covid’e benzer solunum yoluyla bulaşan etkenlerin yarattığı salgınlar da dahil, kontrol altına almak konusunda çok şey biliyoruz.

Filyasyonda Türkiye’den başarılı ülkeler

Nitekim dünyada bazı ülkeler, mesela Moğolistan, Vietnam, Singapur, Tayland, Taiwan bu ilkeleri uygulayarak salgının başlamasını önledi. Başka bazıları da mesela, Güney Kore, Japonya, Çin Halk Cumhuriyeti, Yeni Zelanda, Uruguay, Ruanda zaman zaman ufak dalgalanmalar olsa da kontrol altında tutmayı başarıyorlar.
Bu saydığım ülkelerin çoğunun Güneydoğu ve Doğu Asya’dan olması kanımca tesadüf değil. Bu bölgedeki ülkeler 2002-2003 SARS salgınını yaşamış ve dersler çıkararak aradaki on beş yılda halk sağlığı altyapısını güçlendirmişlerdi. Özellikle de Türkçe’de Latince’den alınmış bir kelimeyle filyasyon dediğimiz, diğer birçok dilde temaslıların aranması (contact tracing, recherche des contactes) denilen sistemi güçlü bir şekilde kurmuşlardı. O kadar ki bu ülkelerin çoğunda filyasyon çalışmasının dedektif gibi “Vaka Sıfır” denilen, bir salgın öbeğine virüsü ilk getiren kişinin bulunmasına kadar sürdüğünü yalnızca kişilerle görüşmeyi değil, bulaşmanın olduğu ortamların incelenip, bulaşmaya katkısı olan faktörlerin belgelendiğini bilimsel dergilerde yaptıkları yayınlardan biliyoruz.

Yukarıdaki ve aşağıdaki şekiller Çin’de yapılmış bir araştırmanın sonuçlarını gösteriyor. Restoranda yemek yiyen henüz belirti göstermeyen, daha sonra pozitif çıkan bir kişinin, kendi masasında ve diğer masalarda enfekte ettiği insanları gösteriyor. Pozitif vaka, klima cihazının altında oturuyormuş; hava akımıyla oldukça uzak masalardaki insanlar da enfekte olmuşlar. Klimaları kullanmayın bilgisi bu makaleye dayanıyor, kapalı ortamlarda bulunmayın bilgisi de. Restoranların ilk kapatılan mekanlar olması da…

Aslında bugün neredeyse her dünya vatandaşının öğrendiği yeni Koronavirüsün bulaşma yolları, en çok hangi ortamları sevdiği gibi bilgileri bu ayrıntılı filyasyon raporları sayesinde öğrendik. Bizden tek bir yayın yok. Bilimsel yayın olmadığı gibi kamuyla paylaşılan tek bir rapor, vaka analizi, öbek analizi vb yok. Dolayısıyla filyasyon çalışmalarının başarısı ve niteliği konusunda fikir yürütmek çok zor.

Bakanın verdiği bilgiler ne kadar doğru?

Bakan testi pozitif çıkanların temaslılarının evde izlenmesinin bir tek Türkiye’de yapıldığını söylemiş. Bu konuda yanıldığını düşünüyorum. Çünkü temaslıların karantinası, sanıyorum Wuhan salgını dışında bütün ülkelerde evde yapılıyor. Her ülke kendi altyapısına göre farklı yöntemlerle karantinadaki bu “temaslıları” izliyor. Mesela Ruanda’da emek yoğun bir şekilde, her köyde, her mahallede bulunan, o köyün/mahallenin ahalisinden seçilmiş ve kısa sürede eğitilmiş, toplum sağlığı çalışanları kullanılıyor. Kore’de, Çin’de, ABD’de telefon takipleri ve karantinanın kırılmasını önlemek için cep telefonu aplikasyonları kullanılıyor.
Ama sonuçta başarılı filyasyon çalışması yürüten bütün ülkelerin bir takip sistemi var, bu olmazsa olmaz. Dolayısıyla Bakanın anlattıklarından uyguladıkları filyasyon programının hangi kısmının Türkiye’ye has olduğunu anlamak mümkün değil.
Zaten kanımca peşinde olmamız gereken şey orijinallikten ziyade başarı olmalı. Salgını kontrol altına almakta başarılı olduğumuzu söylemek mümkün değil. Hızlanan vaka sayılarına da filyasyon ekiplerinin yetişmesi mümkün değil. Yetişemediklerini kırsal bölgelerde, temaslılara bildirimin jandarma tarafından yapıldığını duyunca anlıyoruz. Neresinden baksanız sakıncalı bir yöntem, zira filyasyonda insanlarla güven ilişkisi kurulması, doğru bilginin alınması için hayati önemdedir.
Üstelik temaslı ziyaretinde, yalnızca evde kalın demenin ötesinde temaslının ve ailesinin bulaşmayı önlemek için bilgilendirilmeleri gerekir. Jandarmanın bu konuda herhangi bir yetkinliği olabilir mi? Daha önce Bakanlık vakaların hangi şehirlerden olduğunu açıklamamalarını kişisel bilgilerinin korunması konusundaki duyarlılıklarına bağlamıştı. Kapısına jandarma gönderilen temaslılar, kişisel bilgilerinin korunduğuna inanabilirler mi?

Pozitif hastanın eve gönderilmesi

Dünya Sağlık Örgütü testi pozitif çıkan, testi pozitif olmasa da Covid ile uyumlu belirtiler gösteren herkesin bir sağlık kuruluşuna yatırılarak bakımını ve izolasyonunu öneriyor. Ancak bunun olanaklı olmadığı durumlarda, yani sağlık kurumlarının kapasitesinin vaka sayılarına cevap veremediği hallerde, bu hastaların, yurtlar, stadyumlar, spor salonları vb.den dönüştürülmüş kurumlarda bakılması gerektiğini söylüyor. Ya da riski çok düşük olan ve çok hafif belirtileri olanların, evde bulaşmanın önlenmesi için sıkı tedbirler alınmak koşuluyla eve gönderilebileceğini vurguluyor.
Sağlık Bakanı neredeyse her gün akşam yatak sıkıntımızın olmadığını, yatak doluluk oranlarının yüzde elli civarında olduğunu tekrarlıyor. Üstelik Bakan, iki hafta önce Diyarbakır’da yaptığı basın toplantısında, şehirdeki bulaşmanın yüzde doksanının hanelerde gerçekleştiğini ve o gün yapılan takiplerde, evde olması gereken pozitif hastaların ve temaslılarının yüzde onunun evde bulunamadığını söyledi.
Bu üç bulguyu birbirine bağlayınca testi pozitif çıkanların, üstelik ellerine Hidroksiklorokinin gibi ciddi yan etkileri olan bir ilaç verilip eve gönderilmesini anlamak mümkün değil. Yataklar yarı yarıya boş ise neden izolasyona uymama oranları yüksek insanları, başkalarıyla birlikte yaşadıkları evlere gönderiyoruz? İmkansızlıklar içinde bir ülke olsak, başka çaremiz olmadığı için başvurulabilecek bu yönteme neden başvuruyoruz? Bu gerçekten Türkiye’ye has bir uygulama.

Bulaşma hızı yalnızca filyasyonla önlenemez

Yalnızca hastanelerdeki sağlık çalışanları değil, filyasyonda çalışanlar da dayanma sınırlarının ötesindeler. Kapı kapı gezmekten, yoruldular, enfekte oluyorlar. Bir aile hekimi arkadaşım, Temmuz ayı başında bölgesinde 15 temaslı izlerken, Ağustos ortasında 60 pozitif hasta ve onların dört beş katı temaslısını izlemek zorunda kaldığını söyledikten bir gün sonra kendisinin enfekte olduğunu öğrendim.
Hızlanan sayılara filyasyon ekiplerinin yetişmesi mümkün değil. Net bir strateji geliştirip, tehdidin büyüklüğüne uygun tedbirler alınmadığı sürece ağır hastalığın ve ölümlerin önünü almamız mümkün değil. Virüsün davranışını artık biliyoruz, önlem alınmadığı sürece, hele enfeksiyon bizde olduğu gibi ülke çapında yaygınsa, bulaşma hızlanarak devam ediyor. Maalesef can kayıpları da.